Table of Contents
ISRN Obesity
Volume 2014, Article ID 781841, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/781841
Clinical Study

Accuracy of Neck Circumference in Classifying Overweight and Obese US Children

1Department of Kinesiology, Iowa State University, 235 Forker Building, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2School of Kinesiology and Recreation, Illinois State University, Campus Box 5120, 250 McCormick Hall, Normal, I1 61790, USA
3School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, 502 East Monroe Street, Suite C 250, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA

Received 1 November 2013; Accepted 22 December 2013; Published 30 January 2014

Academic Editors: C. A. Gibson and H. Gordish-Dressman

Copyright © 2014 Youngwon Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate classification accuracy of NC and compare it with body mass index (BMI) in identifying overweight/obese US children. Methods. Data were collected from 92 children (boys: 61) aged 7 to 13 over a 2-year period. NC, BMI, and percent of body fat (BF%) were measured in each child and their corresponding cut-off values were applied to classify the children as being overweight/obese. Classification accuracy of NC and BMI was systematically investigated for boys and girls in relation to true overweight/obesity categorization as assessed with a criterion measure of BF% (i.e., Bod Pod). Results. For boys, Cohen’s (0.25), sensitivity (38.1%), and specificity (85.0%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen’s (0.57), sensitivity (57.1%), and specificity (95.0%) of BMI in relation to BF% categorization. For girls, Cohen’s (0.45), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (91.3%) of NC were smaller in comparison with Cohen’s (0.52), sensitivity (50.0%), and specificity (95.7%) of BMI. Conclusion. NC measurement was not better than BMI in classifying childhood overweight/obesity and, for boys, NC was inferior to BMI. Pediatricians and/or pediatric researchers should be cautious or wary about incorporating NC measurements in their pediatric care and/or research.