Table of Contents
ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 798273, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/798273
Research Article

Do Handling and Transport Stress Influence Adrenocortical Response in the Tortoises (Testudo hermanni)?

Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy

Received 9 December 2013; Accepted 30 December 2013; Published 20 February 2014

Academic Editors: K.-P. Brüssow, J. Foreman, and S. Whisnant

Copyright © 2014 Esterina Fazio et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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