Table of Contents
ISRN Forestry
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 838169, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/838169
Review Article

Foliar Litter Decomposition: A Conceptual Model with Focus on Pine (Pinus) Litter—A Genus with Global Distribution

Department of Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 17 November 2013; Accepted 12 December 2013; Published 27 April 2014

Academic Editors: J. Kaitera and S. F. Shamoun

Copyright © 2014 Björn Berg. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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