Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 846049, 23 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/846049
Review Article

The Dynamic Interactions between Salmonella and the Microbiota, within the Challenging Niche of the Gastrointestinal Tract

Centre for Bacterial Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, The Medical School, University of Newcastle, England NE2 4HH, UK

Received 6 March 2014; Accepted 14 May 2014; Published 10 July 2014

Academic Editor: Konrad Trülzsch

Copyright © 2014 C. M. Anjam Khan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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