Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014, Article ID 906843, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/906843
Clinical Study

Clinical Efficacy of Moringa oleifera Lam. Stems Bark in Urinary Tract Infections

1Ayurvedic Pharmacy Laboratory, Banaras Hindu University, Rajiv Gandhi South Campus, Barkachha, Mirzapur 231001, India
2Department of Dravyaguna, Faculty of Ayurveda, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India

Received 20 May 2014; Revised 6 August 2014; Accepted 2 September 2014; Published 2 November 2014

Academic Editor: Beata Olas

Copyright © 2014 Santosh Kumar Maurya and Anil Kumar Singh. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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