Table of Contents
ISRN Soil Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 920541, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/920541
Research Article

The Effect of Minjingu Phosphate Rock and Triple Superphosphate on Soil Phosphorus Fractions and Maize Yield in Western Kenya

1Kenya Forestry Research Institute, Maseno Regional Centre, P.O. Box 5199, Kisumu, Kenya
2Department of Soil Science, Maseno University, P.O. Box, Private bag, Maseno, Kenya

Received 29 November 2013; Accepted 1 January 2014; Published 4 March 2014

Academic Editors: J. A. Entry and W. Peijnenburg

Copyright © 2014 Robert Orangi Nyambati and Peter Asbon Opala. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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