Table of Contents
International Scholarly Research Notices
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 967361, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/967361
Review Article

Juvenile Hormone Biosynthesis in Insects: What Is New, What Do We Know, and What Questions Remain?

Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA

Received 11 May 2014; Accepted 26 July 2014; Published 19 October 2014

Academic Editor: Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd

Copyright © 2014 Fernando G. Noriega. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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