Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 467071, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/467071
Review Article

Contact-Allergic Reactions to Cosmetics

Department of Dermatology, Contact Allergy Unit, K. U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 30 November 2010; Accepted 11 January 2011

Academic Editor: Fabienne Rancé

Copyright © 2011 An Goossens. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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