Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2011, Article ID 839682, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/839682
Review Article

Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MS L-2040, 1095 Willowdale Road, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA

Received 23 February 2011; Accepted 27 April 2011

Academic Editor: Gordon L. Sussman

Copyright © 2011 Itai Chipinda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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