Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 258145, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/258145
Clinical Study

IgE-Mediated Anaphylaxis to Foods, Venom, and Drugs: Influence of Serum Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Levels and Genotype

1Department of Medicine, St Helier Hospital, Wrythe Lane, Carshalton, Surrey SM5 1AA, UK
2Department of Immunology, St Helier Hospital, Wrythe Lane, Carshalton, Surrey SM5 1AA, UK

Received 6 August 2012; Revised 21 October 2012; Accepted 22 October 2012

Academic Editor: K. Blaser

Copyright © 2012 V. A. Varney et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [3 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • Aisling Flinn, “Allergic Reaction to Peanuts: Can We Predict Reaction Severity in the Wild?,” Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 645–650, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Peter K Smith, Jonathan O’B Hourihane, and Phil Lieberman, “Risk multipliers for severe food anaphylaxis,” World Allergy Organization Journal, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 1–6, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Akiko Sugiyama, Reiko Kishikawa, Satoshi Honjo, Terufumi Shimoda, Haruko Nishie, Chikako Motomura, Naohiko Taba, Yoko Murakami, Mihoko Iwata, Hiroshi Odajima, Tomoaki Iwanaga, and Masutaka Furue, “Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotype is a risk factor for wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis sensitized with hydrolyzed wheat protein,” Allergology International, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar