Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 596081, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/596081
Review Article

Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction in Food Hypersensitivity

Graduate Institute of Physiology, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Suite 1020, no. 1 Jen-Ai Road Section I, Taipei 100, Taiwan

Received 26 May 2011; Revised 6 July 2011; Accepted 8 July 2011

Academic Editor: Kirsi Laitinen

Copyright © 2012 Linda Chia-Hui Yu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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