Table of Contents
Journal of Allergy
Volume 2016, Article ID 7698173, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7698173
Research Article

Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis: A Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

1Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi 110002, India
2Department of Microbiology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi 110001, India
3Department of Pathology, Maulana Azad Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi 110002, India
4Department of ENT, Maulana Azad Medical College and Associated Hospitals, New Delhi 110002, India

Received 31 October 2015; Revised 30 December 2015; Accepted 4 January 2016

Academic Editor: Marek L. Kowalski

Copyright © 2016 Ravinder Kaur et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The study was conducted to study the occurrence and clinical presentation of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), characterize the same, and correlate with the microbiological profile. Clinically suspected cases of fungal rhinosinusitis (FRS) depending upon their clinical presentation, nasal endoscopy, and radiological evidences were included. Relevant clinical samples were collected and subjected to direct microscopy and culture and histopathological examination. 35 patients were diagnosed to have AFRS. The average age was 28.4 years with a range of 18–48 years. Allergic mucin was seen in all the AFRS patients but fungal hyphae were detected in only 20%. 80% of cases were positive for IgE. All the patients had nasal obstruction followed by nasal discharge (62.8%). Polyps were seen in 95% (unilateral (48.57%) and bilateral (45.71%)), deviated nasal septum was seen in 28.57%, and greenish yellow secretion was seen in 17.14%. Direct microscopy and septate hyphae were positive in 71.42% of cases. 91.4% of cases were positive by culture. 5.7% yielded mixed growth of A. flavus and A. niger. Prompt clinical suspicion with specific signs and symptoms along with timely sampling of the adequate patient specimens and the optimal and timely processing by microscopy and culture and histopathological examination is a must for early diagnosis and management.