Journal of Allergy

Nonpharmacological Local Treatment of Rhinoconjunctivitis and Rhinosinusitis


Publishing date
18 Jun 2014
Status
Published
Submission deadline
28 Feb 2014

Lead Editor

1Institute of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology (IMSIE), University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany

2Postgraduate Department of the Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University Córdoba, Cordoba, Argentina

3University of Siena, ENT Unit, Siena, Italy


Nonpharmacological Local Treatment of Rhinoconjunctivitis and Rhinosinusitis

Description

Rhinoconjunctivitis and rhinosinusitis are inflammatory diseases of the mucosal tissue lining the nose and sinuses. The term rhinosinusitis is often used in US publications to refer to both entities or to a combination of rhinoconjunctivitis and rhinosinusitis. Allergic rhinosinusitis (AR) is an IgE-mediated immune response to allergens. It is subdivided into intermittent and persistent allergic rhinosinusitis, and its severity is classified as mild, moderate, and severe. In addition, several nonallergic forms of the disease exist which can be caused by infectious agents, hormonal imbalance, occupational agents, drugs, or physical, emotional, and chemical factors. During recent years, the incidence of AR has increased, resulting in rising impact on economic burden, school/work performance, and commonly associated comorbidities such as asthma and chronic bronchitis.

In parallel with this worldwide development, we notice an increase in the occurrence of episodes of acute rhinoconjunctivitis and in the prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis. Typical symptoms of rhinosinusitis are nasal blockage, increased nasal discharge, facial pain or pressure, and reduction or loss in smell. Initial management of acute rhinosinusitis is mainly symptomatic and intranasal corticosteroids alone or as adjuvant in antibiotic treatment strategies as well as the use of decongestants are common. Additionally, treatment with a number of nonpharmacological remedies is available. However, heterogeneous study designs and a relatively low number of trials make a summary of their efficacies difficult.

Here, we aimed to focus on nonpharmacological treatment strategies for rhinoconjunctivitis and rhinosinusitis, therewith elucidating what alternative treatments are available, and to investigate their effectiveness, risk-benefit ratios, and comparability to their pharmacological counterparts. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Complementary medications/natural products for treating rhinoconjunctivitis and rhinosinusitis
  • Investigating the role of mucosal membranes in the context of rhinoconjunctivitis and rhinosinusitis
  • Investigating the use of nasal spray and eye drops containing natural products in allergic rhinosinusitis
  • Nasal douching

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal’s Author Guidelines which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ja/guidelines. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/submit/journals/ja/locat/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 416236
  • - Editorial

Nonpharmacological Treatment of Rhinoconjunctivitis and Rhinosinusitis

Ralph Mösges | Carlos E. Baena-Cagnani | Desiderio Passali
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 635490
  • - Clinical Study

Clinical Efficacy of a Spray Containing Hyaluronic Acid and Dexpanthenol after Surgery in the Nasal Cavity (Septoplasty, Simple Ethmoid Sinus Surgery, and Turbinate Surgery)

Ina Gouteva | Kija Shah-Hosseini | Peter Meiser
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 654632
  • - Research Article

The Effectiveness of Acupuncture Compared to Loratadine in Patients Allergic to House Dust Mites

Bettina Hauswald | Christina Dill | ... | Yury M. Yarin
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 176597
  • - Clinical Study

Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops in Comparison with Azelastine Containing Nasal Spray and Eye Drops or with Cromoglycic Acid Containing Nasal Spray

Nina Werkhäuser | Andreas Bilstein | Uwe Sonnemann
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 943824
  • - Review Article

Thermal Water Applications in the Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Sarah Keller | Volker König | Ralph Mösges
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 297203
  • - Clinical Study

Noninterventional Open-Label Trial Investigating the Efficacy and Safety of Ectoine Containing Nasal Spray in Comparison with Beclomethasone Nasal Spray in Patients with Allergic Rhinitis

Uwe Sonnemann | Marcus Möller | Andreas Bilstein
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 146280
  • - Clinical Study

Liposomal Nasal Spray versus Guideline-Recommended Steroid Nasal Spray in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Comparison of Tolerability and Quality of Life

Anna Eitenmüller | Lisa Piano | ... | Ludger Klimek
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 292545
  • - Research Article

Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Ectoine Nasal Spray in Patients with Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis

Andrea Eichel | Andreas Bilstein | ... | Ralph Mösges
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 983635
  • - Review Article

Probiotics in the Treatment of Chronic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Chronic Rhinosinusitis

Matthias F. Kramer | Matthew D. Heath
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2014
  • - Article ID 708458
  • - Research Article

The Compatible Solute Ectoine Reduces the Exacerbating Effect of Environmental Model Particles on the Immune Response of the Airways

Klaus Unfried | Matthias Kroker | ... | Ulrich Sydlik