Table of Contents
Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 654207, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/654207
Review Article

Formation of the 42-mer Amyloid 𝜷 Radical and the Therapeutic Role of Superoxide Dismutase in Alzheimer's Disease

1Laboratory of Organic Chemistry in Life Science, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
2Molecular Gerontology, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan

Received 29 October 2010; Accepted 16 December 2010

Academic Editor: Gal Bitan

Copyright © 2011 Kazuma Murakami et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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