Table of Contents
Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2012, Article ID 206520, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/206520
Review Article

Environmental Factors Preceding A 𝜷 40 Monomer to Oligomers and the Detection of Oligomers in Alzheimer's Disease Patient Serum

Department of Medical Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Yamashiro-cho, Tokushima 770-8514, Japan

Received 11 August 2011; Revised 20 October 2011; Accepted 27 October 2011

Academic Editor: Jianning Wei

Copyright © 2012 Yoichi Matsunaga and Midori Suenaga. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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