Table of Contents
Journal of Amino Acids
Volume 2013, Article ID 461901, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/461901
Research Article

Metabolic Fate of the Increased Yeast Amino Acid Uptake Subsequent to Catabolite Derepression

The Institute of Urology and Nephrology, University College London, Charles Bell House, 67 Riding House Street, London W1W 7EY, UK

Received 14 November 2012; Revised 31 December 2012; Accepted 31 December 2012

Academic Editor: Hieronim Jakubowski

Copyright © 2013 John S. Hothersall and Aamir Ahmed. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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