Table of Contents
Journal of Artificial Evolution and Applications
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 725049, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/725049
Research Article

Underdominance, Multiscale Interactions, and Self-Organizing Barriers to Gene Flow

1Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA
2Department of Biology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA

Received 11 March 2009; Accepted 1 June 2009

Academic Editor: Stephen Smith

Copyright © 2009 Margaret J. Eppstein et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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