Table of Contents
Journal of Artificial Evolution and Applications
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 568375, 28 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/568375
Review Article

Evolvability and Speed of Evolutionary Algorithms in Light of Recent Developments in Biology

1Department of Computer Science, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, A1B 3X5, Canada
2Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA

Received 15 September 2009; Accepted 24 February 2010

Academic Editor: Franz Rothlauf

Copyright © 2010 Ting Hu and Wolfgang Banzhaf. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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