Table of Contents
Journal of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 638063, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/638063
Review Article

Fragility of Bioprotectant Glass-Forming Systems in Extremophiles

1Department of Physics, University of Messina, P.O. Box 55, Sperone 31, 98166 Messina, Italy
2Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Matériaux Moléculaires, University of Lille 1, CNRS UMR 8024, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France

Received 25 January 2009; Revised 20 March 2009; Accepted 23 March 2009

Academic Editor: Derrick S. F. Crothers

Copyright © 2009 S. Magazù and F. Migliardo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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