Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 340493, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/340493
Research Article

Size and Shape: Morphology's Impact on Human Speed and Mobility

1Department of Biology, Seattle Pacific University, Suite 205, 3307 3rd Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119-1997, USA
2Department of Anthropology, University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195, USA

Received 27 March 2012; Revised 23 June 2012; Accepted 11 July 2012

Academic Editor: Benjamin Campbell

Copyright © 2012 Cara M. Wall-Scheffler. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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