Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2013, Article ID 185048, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/185048
Research Article

Out on the Land: Income, Subsistence Activities, and Food Sharing Networks in Nain, Labrador

1Department of Anthropology, John Jay College, City University of New York, 524 West 59th Street, New York, NY 10019, USA
2Doctoral Program in Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA
3Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, John Jay College, City University of New York, 524 West 59th Street, New York, NY 10019, USA
4Culture and Mental Health Research Unit, 4333 Chemin de la Cote Ste-Catherine, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E4
5Doctoral Program in Criminal Justice, CUNY Graduate Center, 365 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 13 December 2012; Accepted 17 January 2013

Academic Editor: Santos Alonso

Copyright © 2013 Kirk Dombrowski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In recent Inuit ethnography, a major concern has been how and to what extent contemporary Inuit participate in and depend on subsistence activities, particularly in the context of increasing wage employment and growing participation in the cash economy. This paper provides an analysis of these activities in the predominately Inuit community of Nain, Labrador. Using social network data and demographic information collected between January and June 2010, we examine the interconnections between subsistence activities—obtaining “country food” through activities such as hunting, fishing, and collecting—with access to the means of obtaining subsistence resources (such as snow mobiles, cabins, and boats), employment status, and income. Our data indicate that individuals with higher employment status and income tend to be more central to the network of subsistence food sharing, but not because they have greater access to hunting tools or equipment (they do not). We conclude that those individuals who play the most central role in the network are those who are financially able to do so, regardless of access to hunting tools/means.