Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2013, Article ID 959472, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/959472
Research Article

Children of the Golden Minster: St. Oswald’s Priory and the Impact of Industrialisation on Child Health

Department of Archaeology, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AB, UK

Received 28 February 2013; Revised 1 May 2013; Accepted 13 May 2013

Academic Editor: Maryna Steyn

Copyright © 2013 Mary E. Lewis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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