Table of Contents
Journal of Anthropology
Volume 2014, Article ID 658597, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/658597
Review Article

Violence and Warfare in Precontact Melanesia

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004, USA

Received 13 September 2013; Accepted 4 January 2014; Published 13 March 2014

Academic Editor: Kaushik Bose

Copyright © 2014 Stephen M. Younger. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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