Table of Contents
Journal of Archaeology
Volume 2013, Article ID 540912, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/540912
Review Article

Nonlinear Systems Theory, Feminism, and Postprocessualism

1Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
2Department of Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309, USA

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 15 September 2013

Academic Editor: Yue-Xing Feng

Copyright © 2013 Suzanne M. Spencer-Wood. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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