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Journal of Botany
Volume 2010, Article ID 171435, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/171435
Research Article

Small Heat Shock Protein Responses Differ between Chaparral Shrubs from Contrasting Microclimates

Department of Biological Sciences, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA

Received 26 February 2010; Accepted 30 August 2010

Academic Editor: Tadao Asami

Copyright © 2010 Charles A. Knight. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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