Table of Contents
Journal of Botany
Volume 2010, Article ID 197696, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/197696
Research Article

A Phylogenetic Analysis of Salix (Salicaceae) Based on matK and Ribosomal DNA Sequence Data

1Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Montevallo, AL 35115-6480, USA
2Department of Math and Science, San Jose City College, San Jose, CA 95128-2723, USA
3Department of Biology, University of Joensuu, 80101 Joensuu, Finland
4Department of Forest Resources, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1133, USA

Received 7 September 2010; Accepted 16 November 2010

Academic Editor: Johann Greilhuber

Copyright © 2010 T. M. Hardig et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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