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References

  1. S. Abdul Shakoor and M. A. Bhat, “Phytoliths as emerging taxonomic tools for identification of plants: an overview,” Journal of Botany, vol. 2014, Article ID 318163, 9 pages, 2014.
Journal of Botany
Volume 2014, Article ID 318163, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/318163
Review Article

Phytoliths as Emerging Taxonomic Tools for Identification of Plants: An Overview

Plant Systematics and Biodiversity Laboratory, Department of Botanical and Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab 143005, India

Received 24 January 2014; Revised 30 April 2014; Accepted 2 May 2014; Published 29 May 2014

Academic Editor: Muhammad Y. Ashraf

Copyright © 2014 Sheikh Abdul Shakoor and Mudassir Ahmad Bhat. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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