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Journal of Botany
Volume 2014, Article ID 623651, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/623651
Research Article

Phenolic Composition and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Extracts Obtained from Crataegus azarolus L. var. aronia (Willd.) Batt. Ovaries Calli

1UR Morphogenesis and Plant Biotechnology Research Unit (UR/09-11), Faculty of Science Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 1060 Tunis El Manar, Tunisia
2Metabolic Biophysics and Applied Pharmacology Laboratory, Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine of Sousse, University of Sousse, 4000 Sousse, Tunisia
3Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Higher Institute of Agronomy of Chott Mariem, 4042 Sousse, Tunisia
4Laboratory of Environment Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, 5000 Monastir, Tunisia
5“Abiotic Stress and Cultivated Plants Differentiation” UMR1281 USTL, INRA, IFR147, Lille 1 University of Sciences and Technology, SN2 Building, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex, France
6Pharmacognosy Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, BP 83, 59006 Lille, France
7Laboratory of Genetics Biodiversity and Valorisation of Bioressources (LR11ES41), Higher Institute of Biotechnology, Rue Tahar Haddad, 5000 Monastir, Tunisia

Received 21 August 2013; Accepted 9 December 2013; Published 20 January 2014

Academic Editor: Muhammad Y. Ashraf

Copyright © 2014 Radhia Bahri-Sahloul et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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