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Journal of Botany
Volume 2015, Article ID 201641, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/201641
Research Article

Spatial and Temporal Variation of Carotenoids in Four Species of Trentepohlia (Trentepohliales, Chlorophyta)

Algal Ecology Laboratory, Centre for Advanced Studies in Botany, Department of Botany, School of Life Sciences, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya 793022, India

Received 30 September 2015; Revised 30 November 2015; Accepted 30 November 2015

Academic Editor: Bernd Schneider

Copyright © 2015 Diana Kharkongor and Papiya Ramanujam. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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