Table of Contents
Journal of Biomedical Education
Volume 2014, Article ID 239348, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/239348
Review Article

Integrating Contemplative Tools into Biomedical Science Education and Research Training Programs

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, North Tower Road, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Received 15 February 2014; Accepted 21 May 2014; Published 2 July 2014

Academic Editor: Geoffrey Lighthall

Copyright © 2014 Rodney R. Dietert. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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