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Journal of Biomedical Education
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 376041, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/376041
Research Article

Analysis of Nutrition Education in Osteopathic Medical Schools

1College of Osteopathic Medicine, Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences, 200 University Pkwy, Yakima, WA 98901, USA
2Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine and Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 100, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA
3UNC Nutrition Research Institute, 500 Laureate Way, Kannapolis, NC 28081, USA

Received 4 December 2014; Accepted 4 March 2015

Academic Editor: Lubna Baig

Copyright © 2015 Kathaleen Briggs Early et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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