Table of Contents
Journal of Biomedical Education
Volume 2015, Article ID 575139, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/575139
Research Article

Sources of Stress and Coping Strategies among Undergraduate Medical Students Enrolled in a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

1College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia
2Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences and King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11481, Saudi Arabia

Received 1 June 2015; Revised 1 September 2015; Accepted 8 September 2015

Academic Editor: Chandrashekhar T. Sreeramareddy

Copyright © 2015 Samira S. Bamuhair et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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