Table of Contents
Journal of Biomarkers
Volume 2013, Article ID 709740, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/709740
Research Article

Censored Data Analysis Reveals Effects of Age and Hepatitis C Infection on C-Reactive Protein Levels in Healthy Adult Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

Alamogordo Primate Facility, Building 1303, P.O. Box 956, Holloman AFB, NM 88330-0956, USA

Received 15 October 2012; Revised 18 January 2013; Accepted 21 January 2013

Academic Editor: José Luis Martín-Ventura

Copyright © 2013 John J. Ely et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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