Table of Contents
Journal of Biophysics
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 183516, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/183516
Review Article

Role of the Endothelium during Tumor Cell Metastasis: Is the Endothelium a Barrier or a Promoter for Cell Invasion and Metastasis?

Biophysics Group, Center for Medical Physics and Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany

Received 9 May 2008; Revised 12 October 2008; Accepted 11 December 2008

Academic Editor: Miklós S. Z. Kellermayer

Copyright © 2008 Claudia Tanja Mierke. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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