Table of Contents
Journal of Biophysics
Volume 2008, Article ID 602870, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/602870
Review Article

Molecular Processes in Biological Thermosensation

Laboratory of Cellular Biophysics, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Ginsterweg 1, 52428 Juelich, Germany

Received 11 February 2008; Accepted 16 April 2008

Academic Editor: Eaton Edward Lattman

Copyright © 2008 I. Digel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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