Table of Contents
Journal of Biophysics
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 878236, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/878236
Review Article

Electronic and Spatial Structures of Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-Containing Ligands Underlying Their Ability to Act as Nitric Oxide and Nitrosonium Ion Donors

N. N. Semyonov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin Street 4, Moscow 119991, Russia

Received 5 November 2011; Accepted 22 December 2011

Academic Editor: Eaton Edward Lattman

Copyright © 2011 Anatoly F. Vanin and Dosymzhan Sh. Burbaev. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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