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Journal of Biophysics
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8683713, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8683713
Research Article

Structural Stability, Transitions, and Interactions within SoxYZCD-Thiosulphate from Sulfurimonas denitrificans: An In Silico Molecular Outlook for Maintaining Environmental Sulphur Cycle

1Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, Nadia, India
2Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology, Mahatma Gandhi Avenue, Durgapur, West Bengal, India

Received 27 June 2016; Accepted 1 September 2016

Academic Editor: Konstantin Momot

Copyright © 2016 Sujay Ray and Arundhati Banerjee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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