Table of Contents
Journal of Climatology
Volume 2015, Article ID 262980, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/262980
Research Article

Amplified Feedback Mechanism of the Forests-Aerosols-Climate System

Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

Received 30 December 2014; Revised 9 March 2015; Accepted 10 March 2015

Academic Editor: Alexey V. Eliseev

Copyright © 2015 Thomas Hede et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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