Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2013, Article ID 735397, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/735397
Research Article

A Multilevel Examination of Peer Victimization and Bullying Preventions in Schools

1Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, University of Texas at Arlington, P.O. Box 19595, Arlington, TX 76019, USA
2Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

Received 4 March 2013; Revised 20 May 2013; Accepted 28 May 2013

Academic Editor: Christopher Schreck

Copyright © 2013 Seokjin Jeong and Byung Hyun Lee. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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