Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2013, Article ID 745836, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/745836
Research Article

The Cross-Race Effect: Resistant to Instructions

1Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 335 Burnett Hall, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA
2Department of Psychology, Metropolitan State University of Denver, Denver, CO 80217, USA
3Department of Psychology, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA
4Department of Psychology & Institute of Defense and Security, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA

Received 30 October 2012; Revised 10 January 2013; Accepted 11 January 2013

Academic Editor: Augustine Joseph Kposowa

Copyright © 2013 Brian H. Bornstein et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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