Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 920484, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/920484
Research Article

Attribution of Responsibility for Organizational Wrongdoing: A Partial Test of an Integrated Model

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Texas Christian University TCU, P.O. Box 298710, Fort Worth, TX 76129, USA

Received 7 June 2013; Revised 17 August 2013; Accepted 31 August 2013

Academic Editor: Kevin M. Beaver

Copyright © 2013 Jeannine A. Gailey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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