Table of Contents
Journal of Criminology
Volume 2015, Article ID 963750, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/963750
Research Article

Associations between Gun Violence Exposure, Gang Associations, and Youth Aggression: Implications for Prevention and Intervention Programs

Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, 2001 N. Soto Street, 3rd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA

Received 24 June 2014; Accepted 20 January 2015

Academic Editor: Stelios N. Georgiou

Copyright © 2015 Myriam Forster et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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