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Journal of Drug Delivery
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 107573, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/107573
Review Article

Convection-Enhanced Delivery for Targeted Delivery of Antiglioma Agents: The Translational Experience

1Gabriele Bartoli Brain Tumor Laboratory, Departments of Neurosurgery, Columbia University Medical Center, 1130 St. Nicholas Avenue Room 1001, New York, NY 10032, USA
2Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, 1130 St. Nicholas Avenue Room 1001, New York, NY 10032, USA
3Department of Neurological Surgery, Neurological Institute of New York, 710 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 23 November 2012; Accepted 10 December 2012

Academic Editor: Andreas G. Tzakos

Copyright © 2013 Jonathan Yun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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