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Journal of Drug Delivery
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7913616, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7913616
Research Article

Investigation of Diffusion Characteristics through Microfluidic Channels for Passive Drug Delivery Applications

College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA

Received 11 February 2016; Revised 29 April 2016; Accepted 4 May 2016

Academic Editor: Viness Pillay

Copyright © 2016 Marcus J. Goudie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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