Table of Contents
Journal of Ecosystems
Volume 2013, Article ID 463720, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/463720
Research Article

Dinoflagellate Bloom of Karenia mikimotoi along the Southeast Arabian Sea, Bordering Western India

1Centre of Advanced Study in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Parangipettai 608 502, India
2Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 013, India
3NCAOR, Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India, Headland Sada, Goa 403 804, India
4Aquaculture Foundation of India, Number 4/40 Kapaleeswarar Nagar, Neelankarai, Chennai 600 115, India
5Institute for Ocean Management, Anna University, Chennai 600 025, India
6Applied Microbiology, PSG College of Arts and Science, Coimbatore 641 014, India

Received 6 February 2013; Accepted 30 April 2013

Academic Editor: Felipe Garcia-Rodriguez

Copyright © 2013 R. S. Robin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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