Table of Contents
Journal of Geriatrics
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 792043, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/792043
Research Article

Psychiatric Assessment and Screening for the Elderly in Primary Care: Design, Implementation, and Preliminary Results

1Department of Psychiatry and Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, P.O. Box 140, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065, USA
2Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, P.O. Box 39, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 525 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065, USA
3The Irving Sherwood Wright Center on Aging and Department of Nursing, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 1484 First Avenue, New York, NY 10075, USA
4The Irving Sherwood Wright Center on Aging and Department of Social Work, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 1484 First Avenue, New York, NY 10075, USA
5Weill Cornell Institute of Geriatric Psychiatry and Department of Social Work, New York Presbyterian Hospital, 21 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, NY 10605, USA
6Research Division, Hebrew Home at Riverdale, 5901 Palisade Avenue, Riverdale, NY 10471, USA
7Stroud Center, Columbia University, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY 10032, USA

Received 31 January 2015; Accepted 5 March 2015

Academic Editor: Iracema Leroi

Copyright © 2015 Robert C. Abrams et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. We describe the design and implementation of a psychiatric collaborative care model in a university-based geriatric primary care practice. Initial results of screening for anxiety and depression are reported. Methods and Materials. Screens for anxiety and depression were administered to practice patients. A mental health team, consisting of a psychiatrist, mental health nurse practitioner, and social worker, identified patients who on review of screening and chart data warranted evaluation or treatment. Referrals for mental health interventions were directed to members of the mental health team, primary care physicians at the practice, or community providers. Results. Subjects () comprised 38.2% of the 3940 unique patients seen at the practice during the 4-year study period. 37.1% () screened positive for depression, 26.9% () for anxiety, and 322 (21.4%) screened positive for both. Any positive score was associated with age (), female gender (), and a nonsignificant trend toward living alone (). 8.87% had suicidal thoughts. Conclusions. Screening captured the most affectively symptomatic patients, including those with suicidal ideation, for intervention. The partnering of mental health professionals and primary care physicians offers a workable model for addressing the scarcity of expertise in geriatric psychiatry.