Table of Contents
Journal of Geriatrics
Volume 2015, Article ID 896876, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/896876
Research Article

Gender Differences in the Association between Childhood Socioeconomic Status and Cognitive Function in Later Life

National Institute of Dementia, Seongnam 463-400, Republic of Korea

Received 28 August 2015; Revised 17 November 2015; Accepted 26 November 2015

Academic Editor: Ian Stuart-Hamilton

Copyright © 2015 Jiyoung Lyu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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