Table of Contents
Journal of Hormones
Volume 2015, Article ID 631250, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/631250
Research Article

Psychophysiological Stress Reactivity Relationships across the Menstrual Cycle

1Lustyk Laboratory, Seattle Pacific University, 3307 3rd Avenue West, Seattle, WA 98119, USA
2Phoenix VA Health Care System, Topaz Clinic, 650 East Indian School Road, Phoenix, AZ 85012, USA
3University of Washington, NE 45th Street and 17th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA

Received 21 August 2015; Revised 1 December 2015; Accepted 2 December 2015

Academic Editor: Elisabetta Baldi

Copyright © 2015 Karen C. Olson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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