Table of Contents
Journal of Hormones
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6923239, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6923239
Research Article

Involvement of Ovarian Estradiol Biosynthesis and Pituitary FSH Expression in the Mechanism of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation of Uterine Growth in Immature Female Rats

1INRA, CNRS, Physiologie de la Reproduction et des Comportements, 37380 Nouzilly, France
2Tours University, 37200 Tours, France

Received 25 November 2015; Revised 21 January 2016; Accepted 26 January 2016

Academic Editor: Christos Stournaras

Copyright © 2016 Sandrine Rafert et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. F. Lecompte, E. Harbeby, C. Cahoreau, D. Klett, and Y. Combarnous, “Use of the immature rat uterotrophic assay for specific measurements of chorionic gonadotropins and follicle-stimulating hormones in vivo bioactivities,” Theriogenology, vol. 74, no. 5, pp. 756–764, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. S. L. Steelman and F. M. Pohley, “Assay of the follicle stimulating hormone based on the augmentation with human chorionic gonadotropin,” Endocrinology, vol. 53, no. 6, pp. 604–616, 1953. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. H. H. Cole and J. Erway, “48-hour assay test for equine gonadotropin with results expressed in international units,” Endocrinology, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 514–519, 1941. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  4. Y. Combarnous, “Molecular basis of the specificity of binding of glycoprotein hormones to their receptors,” Endocrine Research, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 670–691, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. F. Apparailly, V. Laurent-Cadoret, F. Lecompte et al., “Structure-function relationships and mechanism of action of pituitary and placental gonadotrophins,” Reproduction, Fertility and Development, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 157–163, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. B. D. Murphy and S. D. Martinuk, “Equine chorionic gonadotropin,” Endocrine Reviews, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 27–44, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. V. Maillard, S. Uzbekova, F. Guignot et al., “Effect of adiponectin on bovine granulosa cell steroidogenesis, oocyte maturation and embryo development,” Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, vol. 8, article 23, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. A. J. Ziecik, P. D. Stanchev, and J. E. Tilton, “Evidence for the presence of luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin-binding sites in the porcine uterus,” Endocrinology, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 1159–1163, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. P. J. Bonnamy, A. Benhaim, and P. Leymarie, “Estrous cycle-related changes of high affinity luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin binding sites in the rat uterus,” Endocrinology, vol. 126, no. 2, pp. 1264–1269, 1990. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. A. Okada, T. Sato, Y. Ohta, and T. Iguchi, “Sex steroid hormone receptors in the developing female reproductive tract of laboratory rodents,” Journal of Toxicological Sciences, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 75–89, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. Palaniappan and K. M. J. Menon, “Luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin-mediated activation of mTORC1 signaling is required for androgen synthesis by theca-interstitial cells,” Molecular Endocrinology, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 1732–1742, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y.-X. Liu and A. J. W. Hsueh, “Synergism between granulosa and theca-interstitial cells in estrogen biosynthesis by gonadotropin-treated rat ovaries: studies on the two-cell, two-gonadotropin hypothesis using steroid antisera,” Biology of Reproduction, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 27–36, 1986. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. D. A. Magoffin, “The ovarian androgen-producing cells: a 2001 perspective,” Reviews in Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 47–53, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. M. Young and A. S. McNeilly, “Theca: the forgotten cell of the ovarian follicle,” Reproduction, vol. 140, no. 4, pp. 489–504, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. D. A. Magoffin, “Ovarian theca cell,” International Journal of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 1344–1349, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. G. Hillier and M. Tetsuka, “Role of androgens in follicle maturation and atresia,” Bailliere's Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 249–260, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. K. Okuda, T. Okazaki, M. Saeki, and H. Mori, “The activity of 17α-hydroxylase/C17-C20 lyase in the ovaries of immature hypophysectomized rats treated with recombinant FSH combined with various doses of human chorionic gonadotropin,” European Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 137, no. 5, pp. 530–536, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. H. Kishi and G. S. Greenwald, “Autoradiographic analysis of follicle-stimulating hormone and human chorionic gonadotropin receptors in the ovary of immature rats treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin,” Biology of Reproduction, vol. 61, no. 5, pp. 1171–1176, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. H. Meij-Roeclofs, T. Uilenbrock, P. Osman, and R. Welschen, “Serum levels of gonadotropins and follicular growth in prepubertal rats,” in The Development and Maturation of the Ovary and Its Function, H. Peters, Ed., pp. 3–11, Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1972. View at Google Scholar
  20. T. A. Camp, J. O. Rahal, and K. E. Mayo, “Cellular localization and hormonal regulation of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone receptor messenger RNAs in the rat ovary,” Molecular Endocrinology, vol. 5, no. 10, pp. 1405–1417, 1991. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. J. J. Peluso, R. W. Steger, and E. S. Hafez, “Development of gonadotrophin-binding sites in the immature rat ovary,” Journal of Reproduction and Fertility, vol. 47, pp. 55–58, 1976. View at Google Scholar
  22. J. Presl, J. Pospísil, V. Figarová, and V. Wagner, “Development changes in uptake of radioactivity by the ovaries, pituitary and uterus after 125 I-labelled human chorionic gonadotrophin administration in rats,” Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 585–586, 1972. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. H. H. Cole, “On the biological properties of mare gonadotropic hormone,” American Journal of Anatomy, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 299–331, 1936. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  24. C. Hermier, Y. Combarnous, and M. Jutisz, “Role of a regulating protein and molecular oxygen in the mechanism of action of luteinizing hormone,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)—General Subjects, vol. 244, no. 3, pp. 625–633, 1971. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. Y. Combarnous, G. Hennen, and J. M. Ketelslegers, “Pregnant mare serum gonadotropin exhibits higher affinity for lutropin than for follitropin receptors of porcine testis,” FEBS Letters, vol. 90, no. 1, pp. 65–68, 1978. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. F. Guillou and Y. Combarnous, “Purification of equine gonadotropins and comparative study of their acid-dissociation and receptor-binding specificity,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)—General Subjects, vol. 755, no. 2, pp. 229–236, 1983. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. F. Stewart, W. R. Allen, and R. M. Moor, “Pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin: ratio of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone activities measured by radioreceptor assay,” Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 471–482, 1976. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. L. Abdennebi, A. S. Lesport, J. J. Remy et al., “Differences in splicing of mRNA encoding LH receptor in theca cells according to breeding season in ewes,” Reproduction, vol. 123, no. 6, pp. 819–826, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. T. Müller, J. Gromoll, and M. Simoni, “Absence of exon 10 of the human luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor impairs LH, but not human chorionic gonadotropin action,” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol. 88, no. 5, pp. 2242–2249, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. J. Gromoll, J. Wistuba, N. Terwort, M. Godmann, T. Müller, and M. Simoni, “A new subclass of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor lacking exon 10 messenger RNA in the new world monkey (Platyrrhini) lineage,” Biology of Reproduction, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 75–80, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. Madhra, E. Gay, H. M. Fraser, and W. C. Duncan, “Alternative splicing of the human luteal LH receptor during luteolysis and maternal recognition of pregnancy,” Molecular Human Reproduction, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 599–603, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. D. Piersma, M. Verhoef-Post, M. P. Look et al., “Polymorphic variations in exon 10 of the luteinizing hormone receptor: functional consequences and associations with breast cancer,” Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, vol. 276, no. 1-2, pp. 63–70, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. J. Gromoll, L. Lahrmann, M. Godmann et al., “Genomic checkpoints for exon 10 usage in the luteinizing hormone receptor type 1 and type 2,” Molecular Endocrinology, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 1984–1996, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus