Table of Contents
Journal of Mycology
Volume 2014, Article ID 324349, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/324349
Research Article

Diversity of Biscogniauxia mediterranea within Single Stromata on Cork Oak

1Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária, I.P. Unidade Estratégica de Sistemas Agrários e Florestais e Sanidade Vegetal, Quinta do Marquês, 2780-159 Oeiras, Portugal
2Centro de Engenharia dos Biossistemas, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal

Received 18 July 2014; Accepted 3 October 2014; Published 14 October 2014

Academic Editor: Massimo Cogliati

Copyright © 2014 Joana Henriques et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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